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Monday, March 16, 2020

Stock markets halted for unprecedented third time due to coronavirus scare

Stock markets halted for unprecedented third time due to coronavirus scare – TechCrunch

Stock markets halted for unprecedented third time due to coronavirus scare – TechCrunch

The morning after the Federal Reserve cut its interest rates to near zero at the urging of the President (a move meant to stabilize jittery markets worried about the economic fallout from the global response to the novel coronavirus pandemic), all of the indexes posted major losses. For the third time in the past two weeks, the Dow hit its emergency circuit breaker as the market opened; the S&P also halted trades.

* The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down nearly 10% at the open, falling by 2,250 points to 20,935

* The S&P 500 fell by 8.14%, or 220.55, to open at

The huge drop mirrored movements in international markets — which were all thrown into turmoil by the Fed’s drastic rate cuts. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index, Japan’s Nikkei, London’s FTSE, and the Shanghai Exchange all saw losses for the day (London is still trading).

Meanwhile, the government is beginning to roll out large scale testing for COVID-19 to finally determine exactly how widely the disease has spread. The latest number, tallied by Johns Hopkins, is nearly 170,000 cases globally, with nearly 3,800 in the U. S.

The see-saw of the markets puts everything into unforeseen territory and not even the supposed digital safe haven of bitcoin is immune. Prices of the digital currency fell to $4,644.53 compared to one month ago, when it was hovering around $10,000.

These circuit breakers were put in place by the Securities and Exchange Commission, and are standardized across major U. S. exchanges since 2012.

Circuit breaker trips are more common on individual stocks (where similar rules apply), but market-wide trading halts are relatively rare. Three in just a matter of a bit more than a week is unprecedented in the history of the U. S. markets, barring the exception of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, in which the New York Stock Exchange and other markets were closed for roughly a week.

Canada will not rule out border closures; medical officer urges strong action against outbreak

Canada will not rule out border closures; medical officer urges strong action against outbreak

Canada will not rule out border closures; medical officer urges strong action against outbreak

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Sunday would not rule out closing borders to combat a coronavirus outbreak, while the chief medical officer said time was running out to prevent a spike in cases.

At least 313 Canadians have tested positive and one person has died. Ontario, the most populous province, saw its largest daily increase so far of 38 new cases, which now total 142.

Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, called for strong action - such as avoiding large public gatherings - to fight the spread of the virus.

“With cases rapidly increasing in Canada ... our window to flatten the curve of the epidemic is narrowing,” she told reporters. Tam said it was not time to declare a national public health emergency, noting most cases involved people who had been abroad.

The Liberal government will soon announce a major stimulus package to help those hit by the outbreak. Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said Ottawa fully understood the seriousness of the situation.

“We are absolutely committed to doing whatever it takes ... to ensure our economy can weather the storm,” she said in a phone interview.

Asked whether foreign visitors might be obliged to go into isolation, Trudeau replied: “We are considering everything.”

When pressed about instances of people hoarding foodstuffs and toilet paper, he insisted supply chains were intact.

“Not panicking about anything is going to be really important,” he said.

Italy, France and Spain report more coronavirus deaths

Italy, France and Spain report more coronavirus deaths

Italy, France and Spain report more coronavirus deaths

Italy, France and Spain, the three European countries hardest-hit by the coronavirus, have each recorded their highest single-day death count. The spike in Italy came despite a national lockdown. Imtiaz Tyab reports from London on how Europe is fighting to contain the spread.

Coronavirus deaths and infections globally surpass China

Coronavirus deaths outside China have surpassed those in China

Coronavirus deaths outside China have surpassed those in China

The number of deaths from the novel coronavirus in other countries has surpassed those inside China for the first time, according to an interactive map tracking the outbreak of the virus from Johns Hopkins University.

China, where the first cluster of coronavirus patients was discovered late last year, has reported 3,217 deaths, including four in Hong Kong. Globally, the number of deaths stands at 3,296 outside of China, including one in Taiwan, according to the tracker’s latest count.

The US so far has reported 3,774 cases and 69 deaths. While New York state accounts for the majority of the cases, Washington state has the most number of reported deaths.

The latest statistics point to the rapidly changing dynamics in the trajectory of the deadly Covid-19 disease. After an initial cover-up of the outbreak, which saw the Chinese government delay announcing the discovery of the virus and silencing whistleblowers and critics, Beijing moved to impose aggressive measures to restrict people’s movements and lock down cities, actions that the WHO has repeatedly praised. The number of new cases reported in China have dropped from thousands per day in mid-February to just 16 yesterday—four of which were in Wuhan, where the outbreak began, and the rest imported from outside of China.

Amid coronavirus fears, Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu sees an opening

Amid coronavirus fears, Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu sees an opening

Amid coronavirus fears, Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu sees an opening

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Here's how the novel coronavirus outbreak unfoldedHere's how the novel coronavirus outbreak unfolded As the spread of coronavirus affects virtually every aspect of life in Israel, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has become a staple of prime-time television. Most evenings, he can be found on the 8pm news broadcasts issuing new instructions and trying to reassure the country of 8.7 million people that everything will be fine.Netanyahu has called for a national emergency government, consisting of all of the parties in the Knesset -- except the Arab parties -- to deal with the impact of the coronavirus.

Trump Says He’s ‘Strongly Considering’ Pardoning Flynn

Trump Says He’s ‘Strongly Considering’ Pardoning Flynn

Trump Says He’s ‘Strongly Considering’ Pardoning Flynn

Mr. Trump’s comments came hours after he called for a day of national prayer in the country.

As passengers returning from Europe faced long waits at airports for health screenings, Mr. Trump initiated a Twitter broadside against Mrs. Clinton, his opponent in the 2016 election.

Mr. Trump, who skipped his Sunday routine on the golf course, also sought to suggest the Obama administration played a role in the current crisis.

“The USA was never set up for this, just look at the catastrophe of the H1N1 Swine Flu (Biden in charge, 17,000 people lost, very late response time),” Mr. Trump tweeted. In fact, under the Obama administration, diagnostic tests for the 2009 swine flu outbreak were approved and shipped less than two weeks after the H1N1 virus was identified and a day before the first death in the United States.

“Can’t believe they are not going after Schumer for the threats he made to our cherished United States Supreme Court, and our two great Justices,” Mr. Trump tweeted. “If a Republican did that, there would be an endless price to pay. Pathetic!” He was referring to comments Mr. Schumer made this month, when he said Justice Brett Kavanaugh and Justice Neil M. Gorsuch had “released the whirlwind, and you will pay the price! You won’t know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions.”

Missouri shooting: Five dead, including gunman

Five dead, including gunman

Five dead, including gunman

Five people including a police officer and a gunman have died in a shooting at a petrol station in the United States state of Missouri after the attacker went inside and opened fire, police said on Monday.

Williams said police received reports of "multiple shooting calls throughout the city" late on Sunday. As officers responded, witnesses reported a vehicle crashed into a Kum & Go petrol station and convenience store, and the armed attacker ran inside and began shooting at customers and employees, Williams said. The first two officers who arrived were shot.

"Both officers showed significant bravery and were heroic in their actions," Williams said.

He said it was too early to comment on the effects the shooting had on his department.

"We're still investigating multiple crime scenes and dealing with grieving the loss of one of our own," he said.

Coronavirus: US man who stockpiled hand sanitiser probed for price gouging

Hand-sanitiser stockpiler probed for price gouging

Hand-sanitiser stockpiler probed for price gouging

A man who stockpiled 17,700 bottles of hand sanitiser to sell on Amazon is being investigated for price gouging.

Matt Colvin, from Chattanooga in Tennessee, told the New York Times he had faced a "huge amount of whiplash".

Mr Colvin later said he would donate his goods but on the same day Tennessee's attorney general opened an investigation, the Times reported.

Mr Colvin said that from 1 March, the day after the first coronavirus-related death in the US was confirmed, he and his brother had spent three days driving across Tennessee, buying up all the hand sanitiser they could find.

After the initial article was published, Mr Colvin faced a major backlash, with many accusing him of attempting to profit off a global crisis.

He expressed remorse in a follow-up interview, saying he "had no idea that these stores wouldn’t be able to get replenished".

In a statement, Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery III said: "We will not tolerate price gouging in this time of exceptional need, and we will take aggressive action to stop it."

Coronavirus kills Iran religious leader as death toll jumps again

Coronavirus kills Iran religious leader as death toll jumps again

Coronavirus kills Iran religious leader as death toll jumps again

COVID-19 has killed a member of the clerical body that appoints the supreme leader, according to Iranian state media, the latest official in the country to die of the highly infectious disease caused by the new coronavirus.

Ayatollah Hashem Bathayi Golpayegani, 78, died two days after testing positive for the new coronavirus and being hospitalised, state news agency IRNA reported on Monday.

Golpayegani represented Tehran in the assembly of experts, an 88-strong body of Muslim scholars that appoints and monitors Iran's supreme leader.

Iran is believed to have about 110,000 hospital beds, including 30,000 in the capital, Tehran. Authorities have pledged to set up mobile clinics as needed.

Zali also acknowledged "many" of those who have died from COVID-19 were otherwise healthy, a rare admission by local authorities that the virus does not only prey on the sick and elderly.

Health ministry figures show while 55 percent of fatalities were in their 60s, some 15 percent were younger than 40.

"We can easily say that the current figures are an underestimation of the actual figures," she said.

Iran has struggled to respond in part because of crippling sanctions imposed by the Trump administration after the US withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal. The US says it has offered humanitarian aid but Iran has rejected it.

Countries across the Middle East have imposed sweeping travel restrictions, cancelled public events and called on non-essential businesses to close for the coming weeks.

On Sunday, it announced the temporary closure of all mosques and called off Friday prayers.

Megadonors pull plug on plan for anti-Sanders super PAC as Biden racks up wins

Megadonors pull plug on plan for anti-Sanders super PAC as Biden racks up wins

Megadonors pull plug on plan for anti-Sanders super PAC as Biden racks up wins

Joe Biden's recent string of primary victories appears to have satisfied wealthy donors who were discussing the creation of a super PAC aimed at pushing Sen. Bernie Sanders out of the race.

Instead, it appears they will hold off on engaging in an all-out assault on Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist who shuns wealthy donors.

Biden is leading Sanders in the primary delegate count after big wins in South Carolina, Super Tuesday states and other delegate-rich states such as Michigan, Missouri and Mississippi. Sanders has won contests in California, New Hampshire and Nevada. They are set to compete for delegates on Tuesday in Florida, Illinois, Arizona and Ohio. Biden is an overwhelming favorite to sweep all four.

There was a growing concern among the Democratic donor class prior to Biden's surge on Super Tuesday that Sanders was on his way to the nomination after picking up two early wins.

Schwartz has been a vocal of opponent of Sanders since the start of the election. His attempts to push Sanders out of the primary including privately reaching out to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Schwartz hoped they would come out to endorse any of the moderate candidates that, at the time, were still in the race.

Since then, all but Biden, Sanders and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who is barely racking up any support, have dropped out of the race.

Biden fired back, calling on Sanders to  get rid of "the nine super PACs that you have." Though Biden did not list them, it appears the former vice president was taking aim at outside groups backing Sanders' candidacy for president, such as Our Revolution, a nonprofit dark money organization.

Coronavirus: anger in Germany at report Trump seeking exclusive vaccine deal

anger in Germany at report Trump seeking exclusive vaccine deal

anger in Germany at report Trump seeking exclusive vaccine deal

MPs and ministers criticise display of ‘self-interest’ and accuse US president of electioneering

MPs and ministers criticise display of ‘self-interest’ and accuse US president of electioneering

The report prompted fury in Berlin. “German researchers are taking a leading role in developing medication and vaccines as part of global cooperation networks,” foreign minister Heiko Maas told the Funke Mediengruppe research network. “We cannot allow a situation where others want to exclusively acquire the results of their research,” said Maas, of the centre-left SPD.

“International co-operation is important now, not national self-interest,” said Erwin Rüddel, a conservative lawmaker on the German parliament’s health committee.

The official also denied the US was seeking to keep any potential vaccine for itself. “We will continue to talk to any company that claims to be able to help. And any solution found would be shared with the world,” the official said.

CureVac, founded in 2000, is based in the German state of Baden-Württemberg, and has other sites in Frankfurt and Boston.

“If we are successful in developing an effective vaccine, then it should help and protect people across the world,” said Dietmar Hopp, head of principle investor dievini Hopp BioTech holding, in a statement.

Altmaier welcomed the statement, saying it was a “fantastic decision”.

He also pointed out the government had the power to scrutinise foreign takeovers, saying: “Where important infrastructure and national and European interests are concerned, we will take action if we have to.”

California Gov. Gavin Newsom calls for bars, wineries to close amid coronavirus; people over 65 to stay home

California Gov. Gavin Newsom calls for bars, wineries to close amid coronavirus; people over 65 to stay home

California Gov. Gavin Newsom calls for bars, wineries to close amid coronavirus; people over 65 to stay home

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sunday called for the closure of all bars and wineries and for all Californians 65 and older to stay home in an effort to curb the coronavirus outbreak.

Newsom made the announcement during a Sunday news conference to discuss the latest updates on how the state is responding to the coronavirus.

The first was a call for home isolation for all seniors above the age of 65 or with chronic conditions to stay indoors. There are 13 task forces to aid in this directive to protect those who are most vulnerable.

Newsom says they are stopping short from shuttering restaurants but will issue guidelines for closures, including pushing restaurants to go more toward the take-out option.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Steelers' offseason plan? There may have been clues at the NFL Combine.

Steelers’ offseason plan? There may have been clues at the NFL Combine.

TribLIVE's Daily and Weekly email newsletters deliver the news you want and information you need, right to your inbox.

TribLIVE's Daily and Weekly email newsletters deliver the news you want and information you need, right to your inbox.

He joined me on 105.9 the X Monday afternoon and we touched on most of them.

First and foremost, these are uncharted waters in the modern era of the draft for the Steelers. They haven’t gone into the annual NFL player selection process without a first-round pick since 1967. Joe tells us how that is impacting the way the Steelers are evaluating the college talent available and whether they may try to trade their way back into the first round after dealing this year’s pick to Miami for Minkah Fitzpatrick.

Then there is the Bud Dupree dilemma. His status on the team is something the Steelers are claiming to prioritize. But they seem to be looking at some potential pass rushers in the draft in case they can’t keep him.

General manager Kevin Colbert also has publicly backed starting quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, his backups and running back James Conner. Joe and I attempt to figure out how sincere that support is.

Listen: Tim Benz and Joe Rutter talk about the NFL Combine and what the Steelers may do in the draft

Tim Benz is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tim at tbenz@tribweb.com or via Twitter. All tweets could be reposted. All emails are subject to publication unless specified otherwise.

'The Bachelorette': Was Clare Crawley Engaged? Benoît Beauséjour-Savard Is Still Rooting for His Ex-Fiancé After Their Breakup

Was Clare Crawley Engaged? Benoît Beauséjour-Savard Is Still Rooting for His Ex-Fiancé After Their Breakup

Was Clare Crawley Engaged? Benoît Beauséjour-Savard Is Still Rooting for His Ex-Fiancé After Their Breakup

Clare Crawley will lead The Bachelorette Season 16, and the fandom is buzzing with excitement. The 38-year-old breaks tradition, as she doesn’t come from Peter Weber’s current season of The Bachelor. But she has been a member of the franchise for some time. And as some longtime viewers have noticed, the last time we saw Crawley, she got engaged to Benoît Beauséjour-Savard during The Bachelor Winter Games reunion. So why did Crawley and Beauséjour-Savard break up? A lot has happened since the couple got together, but Beauséjour-Savard still seems as supportive of his ex-fiancé as ever.

Following her appearances on Juan Pablo Galavis’ season of The Bachelor and the first two seasons of Bachelor in Paradise, Crawley found her way to The Bachelor Winter Games in 2018. Once settled, the hairstylist from Sacramento, California met Beauséjour-Savard from The Bachelorette Canada and Bachelor in Paradise Season 5.

But even so, the couple still got together after filming the reality series. During The Bachelor Winter Games: World Tells All, Crawley revealed she reconnected with Beauséjour-Savard when she returned home to Sacramento. Then when speaking with host Chris Harrison, the Canadian native said he couldn’t stop thinking about Crawley, noting how much he cared for her. So he couldn’t help but reach out when she left the show.

Meanwhile, Crawley reciprocated Beauséjour-Savard’s feelings and expressed how much she loved him in a tearful speech. And in the end, Beauséjour-Savard got down on one knee and proposed to Crawley.

We understand a lot of you have been asking about [our] relationship since the show, and we wanted to thank you all for the love and respect as we navigated it in real life off camera. We do understand however, having a public engagement on TV kind of changes that. It’s with a heavy heart that we have mutually decided to end our relationship. We think the world of eachother, and we were both hoping we could make this work. I’m sorry that this may not be what you want to hear, but it’s our truth. Just know there are no negative feelings here, we are simply two people who believed in love, and were open enough to give it a chance.

Now, a few years after ending their engagement, it appears Crawley and Beauséjour-Savard are still on good terms. In an interview with Life & Style Magazine following Crawley’s Bachelorette announcement on March 2, Beauséjour-Savard confirmed they’ve maintained a friendship long past the breakup.

“I’m glad she got that chance at finding love because we both trust that process. All I want for her is to be happy because she deserves the best,” he said. “She will be the best person to call out her men if they aren’t there for her. I’m sure she will find her soulmate. She will be the best bachelorette, I can tell you this.”

Crawley’s engagement to Beauséjour-Savard may have been short-lived after The Bachelor Winter Games, but it seems there’s no bad blood as the new bachelorette moves forward to find her forever. Now Bachelor Nation fans must wait to see how Crawley’s journey unfolds when The Bachelorette Season 16 premiers on Monday, May 18. Stay tuned.

Read more: ‘The Bachelor’ Producers Finally Realized Who the ‘Most Sought After Demographic’ Is — And Chose ‘The Bachelorette’ Clare Crawley Accordingly

Oscar-Winning Actor Timothy Hutton Raped Me When I Was 14, Says Canadian Ex-Model

Oscar-Winning Actor Timothy Hutton Raped Me When I Was 14, Says Canadian Ex-Model

Oscar-Winning Actor Timothy Hutton Raped Me When I Was 14, Says Canadian Ex-Model

Sera Johnston says she’s a survivor who just wants to speak her truth. His representatives say she’s a liar who just wants money.

The trio of junior high girls had only been chatting with Timothy Hutton for a little while when he suggested they join him and his friends at his hotel. It was 1983 in Vancouver, and for Sera Johnston, 14 years old and already a working actor, it was a dream, a chance to hang out with her Oscar-winning idol, who was in town to shoot the movie Iceman. As for what guys in their twenties might want out of girls her age, she didn’t give it much thought.

“It was like we were entertaining them — cute. We were funny, you know what I mean?” Johnston told BuzzFeed News. But when they got to Hutton’s room, she said, the situation didn’t seem so innocent anymore. Johnston recalled Hutton and his friends offering the girls drinks. She nervously took a seat near the television.Hutton sat down next to her.“He was getting very close to me, like, you know, really kind of sidling up to me, and petting my legs and stuff,” she said. “I was just, like: I think this is going to be bad. I was really wrong about this.

The lawyer who represented Johnston in the resulting mediation had access to a summary of an interview with an actor named Réal Andrews. The one-page document states that though Andrews had no knowledge of the alleged rape, he did see Johnston and her friends in the hotel room.Andrews did not respond to multiple inquiries for this article. But when BuzzFeed News contacted Hutton’s representatives to discuss the allegations, something unusual happened: A law firm sent over a sworn statement from Andrews that starkly refuted those remarks.Andrews’ new statement said he was “not aware that Ms.

On that evening in 1983, Johnston, C.B., and the third friend were hanging out at the Granville Island complex in Vancouver, a collage of restaurants, stores, and venues popular with tourists and locals alike. They had planned a sleepover, and were excited to stay up late and eat pizza. Johnston had taken ballet and one of the girls was a gymnast, and outside the Pelican Bay restaurant, they showed off their skills, exaggeratedly pirouetting and tumbling.

As Johnston did a split, she said, she heard a loud rapping on the restaurant’s window. Three men were beckoning them to come inside. The men were in their twenties, but to Johnston, they looked older. She wondered whether they might be friends of her father, a jazz musician, and decided she should say hello in case she knew them.“I’m going to get in trouble for being sassy,” Johnston remembered thinking.As she got closer, she realized she did recognize one of them: It was Hutton, who just two years earlier had become the youngest person to win a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role in 1980’s Ordinary People, which won Best Picture.

Sera Johnston had started modeling and acting as a child, and at 9 appeared as Helen Keller in a Vancouver staging of The Miracle Worker.She admired Hutton's acting and had even stayed up late to watch him win the Oscar. She didn’t really have idols, she added, “until I saw Timothy Hutton in Ordinary People.”And then there he was in the restaurant, trying to get her and her friends to come in. Johnston told Hutton that her friends didn’t believe it was him. So boyish in Ordinary People and Taps, he was now 22, with a beard, and he appeared to have lost weight.

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That was also when she reached out to the third friend. By email, she asked the friend if she would consider speaking for even 10 minutes to Herman’s investigator.“I appreciate that you need to deal with your demons of the past but I cannot help you,” she said.“I ask that you respect my wishes and do not contact me about this again.But the law firm did secure the corroborating statements from Andrews and from Johnston’s stepfather. “Andrews said our client is telling the truth about being with Hutton in a hotel room,” the report states. “They all met at a restaurant prior to going to the hotel.

Timothy Hutton in American Crime (left) and All the Money in the World.

Johnston said that although she had been assaulted by two men at the same time, her lawyer told her they would focus on Hutton, who in the mid-2010s had appeared in three seasons of the acclaimed TV drama American Crime and the movie All the Money in the World.

Got a tip? You can email tips@buzzfeed.com. To learn how to reach us securely, go to tips.buzzfeed.com.

Public Enemy Says Flavor Flav Was Not Fired Over Politics, Has Been “On Suspension Since 2016”

Public Enemy Says Flavor Flav Was Not Fired Over Politics, Has Been “On Suspension Since 2016”

Public Enemy Says Flavor Flav Was Not Fired Over Politics, Has Been “On Suspension Since 2016”

There was bound to be some big political drama this week, but a less-expected subplot turns out to be the breakdown of Public Enemy. Last week, it was announced that Public Enemy Radio, Chuck D’s new offshoot of Public Enemy, would perform at Bernie Sanders’ rally in LA on this past Sunday. This led to Flavor Flav and his lawyer issuing a statement about Flav’s likeness supposedly being used to market this whole thing, which eventually led to Public Enemy firing him before the rally performance. Flavor Flav responded to the news on Twitter earlier today, criticizing Chuck D’s decision.

In his comments earlier, Flavor Flav bemoaned the idea that he was ousted after all this time, because of politics. Now, Public Enemy has responded, claiming that Flavor Flav was not fired over politics, and has in fact been on suspension since 2016. Here’s the band’s full statement:

Flavor Flav has been on suspension since 2016 when he was MIA from the Harry Belafonte benefit in Atlanta, Georgia. That was the last straw for the group. He had previously missed numerous live gigs from Glastonbury to Canada, album recording sessions and photo shoots. He always chose to party over work.

It’s time to move on and everyone wishes Flavor well.

Who would’ve thought the implosion of Public Enemy would be making headlines this week, but there you have it.

Oppo’s new smartwatch looks just like the Apple Watch

Oppo’s new smartwatch looks just like the Apple Watch

Oppo’s new smartwatch looks just like the Apple Watch

and it looks almost exactly like an Apple Watch.

The new watch will be called the Oppo Watch, and more will be announced about it on March 6th at the company’s Oppo Find X2 launch event, according to a tweet the company posted on Monday.

The watches themselves also look slightly different than the Apple Watch. While the body of the Oppo Watch appears to be pretty similar in shape to the Apple Watch, there’s no knob that could function like the Apple Watch’s Digital Crown — instead, the Oppo Watch has a second and larger button similar to other WearOS devices. The watch on the left also comes in a nice blue color, which isn’t an option for the Apple Watch. And the bands look a little different than those you can get for Apple’s wearable.

Shen also reportedly shared another image of the watch on Weibo on January 30th. It gives a better look at that second top button and reveals a microphone and an interesting green line on the bottom button:

Oppo’s event takes place on March 6th at 4:30AM ET, so we won’t have to wait long to learn more about the Oppo Watch.

Google cloned Apple’s 3D Touch for the Pixel using just software

Google cloned Apple’s 3D Touch for the Pixel using just software

Google cloned Apple’s 3D Touch for the Pixel using just software

Yesterday, Google announced the latest “feature drop” for its Pixel line of Android phones. It’s part of an effort to get people to realize that the Pixel gets software updates ahead of other Android phones and that some of the features it receives stay exclusive to the Pixel. And yesterday’s “drop” epitomizes so many things that are good (and bad) about Google’s hardware efforts, so I wanted to dwell on it for a moment today.

First and foremost, saying that these features were “released” yesterday is only vaguely accurate. Instead, the rollout began yesterday and should theoretically be completed for all users in a couple of weeks. That’s significantly better than the last (and first) feature drop, which trickled out to Pixel owners much more slowly.

Google has very reasonable reasons for not distributing its updates to everybody on day one, but they undercut whatever excitement people may feel when they hear about them — since there’s an indeterminate wait. I covered all this in the newsletter last December with the first feature drop.

Essentially, this new feature lets you press harder to bring up long-press menus faster. In fact, Google’s documentation for Android’s Deep Press API explicitly says it should never do a new thing, it should only be a faster way to execute a long press. The answer to why it only works in certain apps is that a lot of Android developers aren’t using standard APIs for long press actions. Because Android.

Okay, but how does it work? It turns out my hunch was correct: Google has figured out how to use machine learning algorithms to detect a firm press, something Apple had to use hardware for.

Tap your screen right now, and think about how much of your fingertip is getting registered by the capacitive sensors. Then press hard and note how your finger smushes down on the screen — more gets registered. The machine learning comes in because Google needs to model thousands of finger sizes and shapes and it also measures how much changes over a short period of time to determine how hard you’re pressing. The rate of smush, if you will.

The two big reviews (and one big video) yesterday were Nilay Patel’s look at the Mac Pro and the Apple Pro Display XDR. I think both of them fall in a kind of Pro Uncanny Valley. They’re wildly more powerful than what’s been available to Mac users before, sure. But unless you are a specific kind of user, it’s unlikely you’ll get the full value out of their price. They’re too expensive to be aspirational purchases for most semi-pro users and yet the software isn’t quite ready for full-on pro users (at least in the media creation space).

This is a situation that will either resolve itself to the relief of everybody as software catches up... or it won’t. The latter option is a bit of a worst case scenario, coming on the heels of the bad Trashcan Mac years and the years waiting for this new modular design.

I’ll just say it again: there’s a version of this Mac Pro that starts at, say, $2,500 — albeit with more consumer-grade components. Apple clearly doesn’t believe that it’s worth making that kind of tower computer anymore.

┏ Imagine a world without YouTube. Incredible piece of writing by Adi Robertson. YouTube seems like a piece of the internet that’s always been there, been the way it is. But the reality is that it could have gone many other ways.

┏ AT&T TV now available nationwide with Android TV set-top box — and a two-year contract. How many ways is this ridiculous? The two-year contract. The price hikes after a year. The $120 price of a second box. The confusing name. That’s four off the top of my head. If this service is any kind of success, I think it makes the case for AT&T having too much market power. In no sane marketplace does this thing even get off the ground.

┏ Nvidia’s GeForce Now is becoming an important test for the future of cloud gaming. In earlier newsletters I’ve presented this as analogous to the channel carriage fits we see on cable TV. That’s still true, but it leaves out the fact that in gaming there are lots of smaller developers who also have concerns. Nick Statt’s evenhanded look at all of the controversy is the definitive take on the subject right now.

Foxconn expects iPhone production to return to normal this month

Foxconn expects iPhone production to return to normal this month

Foxconn expects iPhone production to return to normal this month

Foxconn, the main assembler of Apple () products such as the iPhone and iPad, expects to resume normal production by the end of the month after the coronavirus outbreak forced it to close factories in China in late January.

G-7 countries promise to use policy tools but offer no specific actions to combat coronavirus

G-7 countries promise to use policy tools but offer no specific actions to combat coronavirus

G-7 countries promise to use policy tools but offer no specific actions to combat coronavirus

Officials of most of the world's largest economies pledged on Tuesday a united front in the battle against the novel coronavirus scare but offered no specific actions.

U. S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell led a conference call with finance ministers and central bank leaders from each of the nations. Various other officials participated, including Haruhiko Kuroda, the governor of the Bank of Japan.

"Alongside strengthening efforts to expand health services, G7 finance ministers are ready to take actions, including fiscal measures where appropriate, to aid in the response to the virus and support the economy during this phase," the statement said. "G7 central banks will continue to fulfill their mandates, thus supporting price stability and economic growth while maintaining the resilience of the financial system."

There have been 91,320 confirmed cases of the COVID-19 strain globally that have led to 3,118 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins tracking. The U. S. has seen 105 cases and six deaths.

In addition to the U. S. and Japan, the G-7 countries are Canada, the U.K., France, Germany and Italy.

Dow futures higher on hopes of global monetary stimulus CNBC

Dow set to drop 200 points after G-7 fails to deliver policy action to combat coronavirus

U. S. stock index futures indicated a lower open on Tuesday after a statement by the G-7 failed to assuage investor concerns over how the biggest global economies will curb the economic impact of the coronavirus.

As of 7:39 a.m. ET, Dow Jones industrial Average futures indicated a drop of about 136 points at the open. Futures on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 also pointed to a decline.

Investors have been fretting over a potential economic slowdown as the coronavirus spreads around the world. More than 89,000 coronavirus cases have been confirmed globally along with more than 3,000 deaths related to the virus.

The virus’ fast spread led investors to price in easier monetary policy from the Federal Reserve.

In a statement announcing the decision, the Australian central bank’s governor acknowledged that the coronavirus outbreak overseas is having a “significant effect” on the country’s economy and said the move to ease monetary policy was done to “provide additional support to employment and economic activity.”

Monday saw U. S. stocks snap a losing streak that had gone on for over a week. Some investors are skeptical that the rally has legs without a significant central bank response. Even if that comes to fruition, investors have their doubts the market has seen the end of its tumultuous trading of the last six days.

The U. S. stock market saw a historic bounce back on Monday, with the Dow gaining nearly 1,300 points. The Dow finished up 5.1% on the day, while the S&P 500 gained 4.6%.

Some expect central banks around the world to announce a coordinated policy response to fight the coronavirus. Goldman Sachs chief economist Jan Hatzius said on “Closing Bell” that he expects most central banks for G-10 countries to cut rates, with only the Bank of Japan abstaining.

Futures traders are expecting aggressive action from the Federal Reserve in particular, with the CME Fed Watch tool showing that the market has priced in 75 basis points of cuts through April.

US to cut number of employees at Chinese media outlets

US to cut number of employees at Chinese media outlets

US to cut number of employees at Chinese media outlets

The United States said it would slash the number of Chinese nationals permitted to work at the US offices of major Chinese state-owned media outlets in response to what Washington said was Beijing's "long-standing intimidation and harassment of journalists".

Citing a "deepening crackdown" on all forms of independent reporting inside China, administration officials said Beijing's attacks on free speech were worse than they were 10 years ago, comparing them to those of the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War.

"For years, the government of the People’s Republic of China has imposed increasingly harsh surveillance, harassment, and intimidation against American and other foreign journalists operating in China," US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement.

Monday's decision was not particularly linked to the Wall Street Journal case or to the content the Chinese outlets in question produced, senior State Department officials told reporters, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"We have some differences but we do not think it is appropriate for the United States to take steps in interfering with the work of journalists coming from China," China's UN Ambassador Zhang Jun told a news conference.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said the decision effectively meant some Chinese journalists would be expelled from the country.

The personnel caps would be placed on the organisations rather than individuals, so it would be up to the media outlets to decide the necessary staffing cuts, the officials said.

The US will also announce in the near future limits on the duration of stay for Chinese journalists, they added.

The 'Leaning Tower of Dallas' comes down 2 weeks after it was set to implode

The 'Leaning Tower of Dallas' comes down 2 weeks after it was set to implode

The 'Leaning Tower of Dallas' comes down 2 weeks after it was set to implode

The 'Leaning Tower of Dallas' comes down 2 weeks after it was set to implodeChat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. A woman poses for a photo with the so called "Leaning Tower of Dallas" as a crew works to topple the structure north of downtown Dallas.The "Leaning Tower of Dallas" is leaning no longer.The 11-story building fell on Monday, a week after demolition crews took a wrecking ball to it. And another week after its failed implosion.The building became a local marvel after its center withstood the strategically placed explosion, if at a slight angle.

‘He and I have flirted unabashedly for 20 years’: Kathleen Parker’s defense of Chris Matthews sparks #MeToo debate

Kathleen Parker’s defense of Chris Matthews sparks #MeToo debate

“Chris Matthews is a friend of mine,” tweeted Kathleen Parker, a Washington Post columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner. “He and I have flirted unabashedly for 20 years. This is an atrocious end to a noble, happy-warrior career. I will continue to be his friend.”

Parker appeared to be referring to one of the events that preceded Matthews’s unexpected exit: journalist Laura Bassett publishing a GQ.com article on Saturday that detailed what she described as the host’s “long history of sexist comments and behavior” toward women on- and off-air. Bassett wrote that Matthews “inappropriately flirted” with her when she was a guest on his show, noting that a number of other women also had similar experiences.

Soon, Parker’s tweet was at the center of a heated #MeToo debate as detractors slammed the columnist for “[discrediting] alleged victims” while Matthews’s supporters lamented that he “got the screws put to him.” By early Tuesday, the tweet had amassed more than 1,000 replies and hundreds of retweets.

“The friend’s ‘He never did it to ME’ vouch-for is meaningless, since the friend wasn’t always there, AND it discredits alleged victims,” tweeted CNN host S. E. Cupp. “THIS one also manages to dismiss harassment as mere flirting, an idea that, like Matthews, has rightly been retired.”

After Parker’s tweet about Matthews, several people called her out Monday night, arguing that while she may not have minded Matthews’s “flirting,” other women did.

“We should all be friends with whoever we want and flirt with whoever we want in our private non-work lives but women shouldn’t have to choose between torpedoing their careers and spending 20 years flirting unabashedly with a man they can’t stand,” tweeted feminist writer Jill Filipovic.

“The harassment has been invasive, cruel and personal,” she tweeted. “And it’s all worth it if he will never have the platform to demean and objectify us again.”

UPS worker planning mass shooting had 20,000 rounds of ammo and weapons cache, police say

UPS worker planning mass shooting had 20,000 rounds of ammo and weapons cache, police say

UPS worker planning mass shooting had 20,000 rounds of ammo and weapons cache, police say

Authorities searching the California home of a UPS worker who threatened a mass shooting found body armor, tactical rifles and 20,000 rounds of ammunition.

Bloomberg Bets $500 Million On Super Tuesday Wins After Skipping Early States

Bloomberg Bets $500 Million On Super Tuesday Wins, Talks About Convention Deal

Bloomberg Bets $500 Million On Super Tuesday Wins, Talks About Convention Deal

No matter what happens on Super Tuesday, former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has already made history.

The billionaire philanthropist and businessman has run the most expensive self-funded campaign ever, crossing the $500 million mark in ad spending alone in the days before Tuesday's contests. "You've all heard the slogans, 'Mike will do it,' 'Mike will get it done.' And if you haven't, I've wasted an awful lot of money," he quipped at a campaign stop in Tennessee over the weekend.

"The most likely scenario for the Democratic Party is that nobody has a majority — it goes to a convention where there's horse trading and everybody decides to compromise," Bloomberg said. He added "it doesn't even have to be the leading candidate; it could be the one with a smaller number of delegates." He said the rules say you can "swap votes and make deals."

Bloomberg entered the race — exactly 100 days before Super Tuesday — at a moment of Democratic anxiety about the field and former Vice President Joe Biden's performance. Bloomberg announced his bid as "a new choice for Democrats," with a focus on competing within the moderate wing of the party. However, on the eve of Tuesday's primaries, Biden is in a radically different position coming out of South Carolina, with a decisive victory over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and with more enthusiasm and endorsements going into Tuesday.

What scant polling exists in Super Tuesday states suggests otherwise. The latest NBC poll, out Sunday, had Bloomberg lagging in third place behind Sanders and Biden in Texas and North Carolina. Biden's nearly 30-point win over Sanders in South Carolina, however, proved that polling can be wildly off in a race where so many voters are making up their minds at the last minute.

While Bloomberg has campaigned in all 14 Super Tuesday states, he's particularly focused on states rarely visited by Democrats in primary fights: Arkansas, Oklahoma and Tennessee, as well as Texas and North Carolina because of their more centrist lean. Bloomberg made stops in all of those states in the days before Tuesday's contests.

"I'm in it to win it," Bloomberg said Monday at a campaign stop in Northern Virginia.

He also tweeted that he plans to campaign this week in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Florida — key swing states holding primaries in March and April.

Regardless, Bloomberg's role in 2020 is expected to continue. He has pledged to continue to spend money to elect whoever is the nominee — even if it is Sanders. That promise has engendered a lot of goodwill from the Democratic voters who have shown up at his rallies. "The last election, that wasn't done. Hillary was out there by herself," said Dominique Frost, a business consultant who is a first time candidate for local office from Memphis, Tenn. "So for him to say that — that he would keep all of his headquarters operating and he would support whatever Democrat wins in the primary — I think that says a lot about him.

WHO chief warns 'we are in uncharted territory' as number of coronavirus cases worldwide passes 90,000

WHO chief warns 'we are in uncharted territory' as number of coronavirus cases worldwide passes 90,000

WHO chief warns 'we are in uncharted territory' as number of coronavirus cases worldwide passes 90,000

Knowing & understanding an epidemic is the first step to defeating it.

We are in unchartered territory with #COVID19. We have never before seen a respiratory pathogen that is capable of community transmission, but which can also be contained with the right measures.

— Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (@DrTedros) March 2, 2020

Carney Sees ‘Powerful’ Global Virus Response as G-7 Nears

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Dow futures higher on hopes of global monetary stimulus CNBC

Dow futures higher on hopes of global monetary stimulus

You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 29, 2014 in New York City. In morning trading the Dow opened down more than 100 points, continuing a recent volatility trend in the markets partly fueled by drops in tech stocks and continued protests in Hong Kong.

As of 5:15 a.m. ET, the Dow Jones industrial average indicated a positive open of more than 50 points. Futures on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 were both slightly higher. The premarket moves follow a roaring comeback rally in the previous session that saw the Dow post its biggest percentage gain since March 2009. The index also recorded its largest-ever point surge on Monday. A Reuters report said the Group of Seven industrial powers is expected to issue a statement Tuesday or Wednesday on countering the impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

Futures traders are expecting aggressive action from the Federal Reserve in particular, with the CME Fed Watch tool showing that the market has priced in 75 basis points of cuts through April. Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis, and live business day programming from around the world.

The Dow lost 12% in one week. Here's why and what likely happens next

White House places cap on Chinese state media employees in US following expulsion of WSJ reporters

White House places cap on Chinese state media employees in US following expulsion of WSJ reporters

White House places cap on Chinese state media employees in US following expulsion of WSJ reporters

The reporters were expelled after outrage in China over an opinion piece printed in the Journal whose headline referred to China as "the real sick man of Asia," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said during a news briefing on Feb. 19.

The cap comes weeks after China revoked the press credentials of three Wall Street Journal reporters based in Beijing, a move that sparked fury from White House officials.

The reporters were expelled after outrage in China over an opinion piece printed in the Journal whose headline referred to China as "the real sick man of Asia," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said during a news briefing on Feb. 19.

The cap comes weeks after China revoked the press credentials of three Wall Street Journal reporters based in Beijing, a move that sparked fury from White House officials.

"Our goal is reciprocity. As we have done in other areas of the U. S.-China relationship, we seek to establish a long-overdue level playing field," Pompeo said in a statement to CNBC about the cap. "It is our hope that this action will spur Beijing to adopt a more fair and reciprocal approach to U.S. and other foreign press in China."

"We urge the Chinese government to immediately uphold its international commitments to respect freedom of expression, including for members of the press," Pompeo added.

The move to impose a cap may escalate already-existing tensions between the United States and China, which come as the deadly coronavirus outbreak continues to spread globally.

The Chinese Foreign Ministry did not respond to a request for comment from CNBC.

— CNBC's Amanda Macias and Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report.

Secret documents on Trump Afghanistan peace deal shared with Congress

Secret documents on Trump Afghanistan peace deal shared with Congress

Secret documents on Trump Afghanistan peace deal shared with Congress

The Agenda: The Future of Prosperity

The Trump administration is making available to Congress two secret documents related to the United States' peace agreement with the Taliban, part of the White House's effort to build support for ending the longest military conflict in American history.

Both Engel and Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jim Risch (R-Idaho) plan to hold hearings to review the agreement, although neither has scheduled any session at this point. Since the agreement is not a formal treaty, Trump does not have to submit it to Congress for approval.

“We knew the Taliban is not a nice organization, they’re pretty ruthless. But what’s the alternative?”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) was also cautiously supportive of the agreement, which reduces U.S. troop levels to 8,600 personnel and closes several bases. In return, the Taliban is required to cut all ties to al Qaeda and other terror organizations while entering into power-sharing negotiations with the current U.S.-backed Afghan government.

"After nearly 20 years, two basic principles are clear," McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday. "No. 1: We should welcome any serious opportunity to bring greater stability to this land. But number two: We must make certain that the progress won through great sacrifice by Afghans and Americans is not undermined by any precipitous rush for the exits."

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), who serves on Foreign Relations and vocal Trump critic, said he has "been generally supportive of the president's approach to getting a deal [on Afghanistan.] I'm worried about the terms. But I don't not there are a lot of other options other than sticking around for another couple decades."

"I'm gonna be optimistic," said Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.), another member of the panel. "We need to move on in Afghanistan, which means we need to be realistic as to an endgame. But we also need to know there's going to be firm commitments about what the Taliban is going to do about terrorist organizations."

White House pulls nomination of key Pentagon official who questioned legality of Ukraine aid hold

White House pulls nomination of key Pentagon official who questioned legality of Ukraine aid hold

White House pulls nomination of key Pentagon official who questioned legality of Ukraine aid hold

White House pulls nomination of key Pentagon official who questioned legality of Ukraine aid holdChat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. The White House is withdrawing the nomination of Elaine McCusker to be the Pentagon's comptroller, according to a White House official. McCusker was the Pentagon's acting comptroller who raised concerns about the legality of Ukraine military aid being held by the Trump administrationPolitico was first to report on McCusker's nomination being pulled.McCusker's name -- and qualms about the aid -- have appeared in correspondence between government officials.

The 'leaning tower of Dallas' has finally been demolished

The 'leaning tower of Dallas' has finally been demolished

The 'leaning tower of Dallas' has finally been demolished

Developers initially intended for the entire building to come down Feb. 16, though the core did not, until today, March 2, 2020 when it came crashing down after a 5,600-pound wrecking ball has chipped away at the former Affiliated Computer Services building for the past week.

Buttigieg: We Need to Bring Change to the White House

We Need to Bring Change to the White House

Mar.02 -- Former Mayor and Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is ending his presidential campaign after failing to secure the diverse coalition needed to win the Democratic nomination. He speaks to supporters in South Bend, Indiana.

China sees 'coming victory' over coronavirus as global alarm spreads

China sees 'coming victory' over coronavirus as global alarm spreads

China sees 'coming victory' over coronavirus as global alarm spreads

In Iran, a close adviser to adviser Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei died after contracting coronavirus. The head of a religious sect in South Korea got down on his knees and bowed deeply out of shame for his organization's role in the disease's spread. Italy has quarantined churches and urged doctors to come out of retirement. The new and frightening virus that has tightened borders, led to massive disinfection programs and roiled global markets has been detected in at least 70 countries with 90,000 cases and 3,100 deaths. China, where COVID-19 originated, remains the hardest-hit nation, with 80,151 cases and 2,943 deaths, but its ambassador to the United Nations said late Monday that it has turned a corner in battling the disease.

Australia’s Central Bank cut interest rates and signaled it was prepared for further monetary easing measures in order to make up for an economic slowdown in China caused by the virus. President Donald Trump has urged the U.S. Federal Reserve to cut interest rates in response to the outbreak. A majority of global stock market indexes gained Tuesday, although Tokyo's benchmark Nikkei 225 lost 1.2%

North Korea still claims zero infections, more than a month after the WHO declared the virus a Public Health Emergency of International concern and despite the metastasizing presence of it in South Korea. "Unfortunately, the international community has no idea if the coronavirus is spreading inside North Korea,” said East Asia expert Jessica Lee in a recent report for the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft, a think tank in Washington. "The fact that we know nothing about the level of infection or deaths within North Korea is extremely problematic and, left unchanged, could have serious public health implications.

Ukraine confirmed its first case of the virus, on the heels of reported cases for the first time in Gibraltar, Morocco, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia and Yemen.

The world's top finance ministers from the Group of Seven (G7) nations were expected to hold a global teleconference Tuesday over potential concerted action by policymakers to stem the damage the virus has caused to the global economy. Countries from Germany to Vietnam have cancelled large annual events from car shows to technology fairs. Commercial airlines have cancelled hundreds of flights. Tourism has ground to a halt. Large corporate employers have advised staff to work from home where possible. The virus risks a worldwide recession.