Tuesday, May 12, 2020

New Ways to Eat Carbon Dioxide, Possibility of Spinach

New Ways to Eat Carbon Dioxide, Possibility of Spinach

Spinach of various qualities is on the diet of many. Researchers gave a new news about this spinach leaf. The organic membranes of spinach leaves can convert carbon dioxide into sugar with the help of special chemicals. The artificial chloroplasts invented by the researchers will be used in the future

Spinach of various qualities is on the diet of many. Researchers gave a new news about this spinach leaf. The organic membranes of spinach leaves can convert carbon dioxide into sugar with the help of special chemicals. The artificial chloroplasts invented by the researchers will be used in the future to cure various diseases or to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This information has been informed in a recent report published on Nature.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Germany have studied spinach and artificial chloroplasts. Research articles have been published in the journal Science.

New ways to eat carbon dioxide have been found, Nature reports. Researchers have created synthetic versions of photosynthetic structures or chloroplasts in plant cells. It uses sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into sugar with the help of laboratory chemicals.

Researchers say that this artificial photosynthesis process could be used in therapeutic drug factories. In the future, such processes could be used to remove carbon dioxide from the environment. However, it is not yet clear whether this can be done on a large scale or how financially sustainable it will be.

There are six ways to fix carbon in nature. It uses enzymes to convert solar energy or chemical energy into sugar. In 2016, Tobias Arab, a synthetic biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany, and his colleagues developed the seventh method.

"We worked on a more efficient way to remove carbon dioxide using thermodynamic and kinetic methods," Tobias said. This method is called the CETCH cycle, which is essentially a complex network of enzymes and produces 20 percent more energy than the natural photosynthesis method. It was not clear, however, whether this would be consistent with the functioning of living cells. To explore this method, Tobias and his colleague Tyrone Miller began research on spinach. He separates the membrane of light-collecting spinach from chloroplasts. It is then added to the reaction with 16 enzymes of the CETCH cycle. After making some changes, they found that the spinach membrane and enzymes were working together. They thus make effective artificial chloroplasts. The enzymes convert carbon dioxide into glycolate, which is used to make various organic matter.

This is an important discovery, says Paul King, a biochemist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

Tobias Arab said they are creating an artificial system to replace spinach by producing spinach because membrane collection is time consuming.

Yutesu Kuruma, a synthetic biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, said, "We can use chloroplast simulation as an energy-producing system for artificial cells." They haven't done it yet.

But researchers have not stopped. They are conducting research on synthetic cells in collaboration with researchers in the United States.

"Nature is very conservative," said researcher Tobias. It never matched the full range of photosynthesis. We understand that nature has never touched the solutions. That is exciting for us.