Thursday, October 8, 2020

Facebook is like smoking cigarettes

Tim Kendall, a former director of Facebook, said his job was to make Facebook as addictive as smoking. He thinks that social media is just as harmful for the users. Tim Kendall testified Thursday before the U.S. House Consumer Protection and Commerce subcommittee. He blamed Facebook's algorithms for

Facebook is like smoking cigarettes

Tim Kendall, a former director of Facebook, said his job was to make Facebook as addictive as smoking. He thinks that social media is just as harmful for the users.


Tim Kendall testified Thursday before the U.S. House Consumer Protection and Commerce subcommittee. He blamed Facebook's algorithms for creating discrimination and psychological problems and spreading false information.


In short, we are destroying our overall consciousness.

Who knows, we might be heading for a civil war.

- Tim Kendall, former director of Facebook


Kendall said, ‘The social media that I and others have been building together for over 15 years is terribly depleting people. In short, we are destroying our overall consciousness. Who knows, we might be heading for a civil war. '


Tim Kendall joined Facebook in 2006 as the first Director of Monetization. Until 2010, he was in office. His job was to build Facebook as an economically profitable organization, creating different sources of income. Kendall said he thought his role would be to look after the interests of Facebook as well as work for the welfare of the user. But profits were above everything for Facebook. Kendall is now the CEO of Moment, a time management app.


Works with user emotion


While testifying, Kendall, a lawmaker, said about Facebook's algorithm, "Facebook has always tried to make users emotional in order to make more money by keeping users' attention." And that is why priority has given to disgusting, bad news and discriminatory content.


In addition to Kendall, many other former Facebook executives have referred to social media as a discriminatory platform. Last month, an engineer resigned from Facebook with such allegations. A fired data scientist recently accused Facebook of not taking adequate measures to prevent the spread of fake information.


Facebook often comes under fire from protesters with misinformation and hateful content. Last summer, a thousand organizations led by human rights organizations announced a boycott of Facebook as an advertising platform. Meanwhile, many important personalities stopped using Facebook and Instagram for a day this month in protest against the hateful comments.


Restrictions may be imposed


The US government may impose restrictions on social media in the future to prevent the spread of fake information on Facebook. Jan Shakaowski, head of the House Consumer Protection and Commerce subcommittee, said: In all countries, they are doing their own thing by understanding the government. The big IT companies have created divisions among us and started genocide somewhere. '


Democrats and Republicans on the subcommittee have agreed to amend Article 230 of the country's law, although they have raised different issues. This section states that social media cannot be blamed for user posts.